Hands-On Science Bringing the Outside World into Focus for Children

To address the minimal time spent on science in early education and to promote outdoor classrooms in elementary schools, the Out Teach nonprofit helps teachers, schools, districts, and communities build outdoor learning labs that encourage hands-on science lessons, embed science instruction into various subjects, and inspire students to view science as a potential career path.

Data Science Learning Experiences for K–12 Classrooms

Data literacy is a key twenty-first century skill for nearly every occupation and daily life. It helps us better engage in the world around us and make informed decisions. Data Science 4 Everyone (DS4E) is a growing coalition of individuals and organizations elevating the importance of data literacy and expanding access to K–12 science education for every student.

Online Summer Program Exposing Students to the Field of Artificial Intelligence

As the field of artificial intelligence (AI) continues to make a big impact in the world, researchers and educators at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL) believe that to develop inclusive, humanistic, and benevolent technologies, the field of AI needs to include students, researchers, and technologists from all walks of life.

Virtual Adventures Opening Windows into Science Careers

Teachers and students can go on a scientific adventure from their own classroom. Hosted by a live museum educator from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Virtual Science Academy classes offer award-winning, two-way interactive videoconferencing.

Digital Engineering Design Game for Early STEM Learners

From the Smithsonian Science Education Center, Tami’s Tower: Let’s Think About Engineering is a free educational engineering design game that helps children design solutions to a problem using basic engineering design principles. The game is aligned to educational science standards for K–12 and is designed for emergent readers.

Guide to the Surprising Science of Snowflakes

Snowflakes fall with a fascinating variety of shapes and patterns, including stellar dendrites, hollow columns, and triangular crystals. Why do snowflakes have the shapes they do? Why are they all so different, while the six branches grow so similarly?